Online electronic rights fundraiser

Online electronic rights fundraiser

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hey, these guys are a really good group fighting for our mutual rights, like the EFF

Here's the details on a fundraiser coming up:

Public Knowledge is a Washington D.C. public-interest organization that works at the intersection of technology policy and intellectual property. More information at publicknowledge.org
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Public Knowledge is having a fundraiser/party to celebrate the growing number of Silicon Valley companies that are beginning to understand the importance of getting involved in Washington DC tech policy. Decisions being made in Washington are effecting the regulatory climate for tech companies, and could have a big impact on the entire tech industry.

Wednesday, April 21st 7pm – 9pm

At the Frey-Norris Gallery, 456 Geary between Mason and Taylor,

directions

$35 pre-registration here, $40 at the door. Your registration is a donation to Public Knowledge, and is tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law.

We'd like to thank and glorify the 21 tech companies that last month signed onto the FCC filing opposing the Broadcast Flag. It was a formidable beginning to what we hope will develop into an influential "tech side" in the policy debates. More and more companies are beginning to understand that FCC interference could hurt the tech industry, keep new markets from emerging, handicap Open Source development, slow innovation and increase the regulatory burden for tech companies.

We'd also like to raise awareness of the next FCC proceeding that will affect the tech industry. The FCC's Cognitive and Software-Defined Radio rulemaking is extremely important–it could determine how spectrum is allocated in the future, what kinds of applications can run on wireless data networks, and what kinds of devices can use these networks. In the near future, Cognitive Radio will make it technically possible to use spectrum more efficiently; companies and products will be able to compete in a space that's now the sole domain of incumbent operators. However, if we want to see the full potential of this technology, we need to keep the FCC from unduly regulating it.

Join your Silicon Valley capitalist comrades for the most fun you'll ever have influencing FCC policy. Feel free to invite your friends, and broadcast this invitation widely.

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