"citizens' journalism" keeps people out of jail

"citizens' journalism" keeps people out of jail

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People are using their video phones to record the real version of news, and in this cases, it really helped people falsely accused, and also the cops. This all happened at the "Republican" National Convention last year.

For Mr. Kyne and 400 others arrested that week, video recordings provided evidence that they had not committed a crime or that the charges against them could not be proved, according to defense lawyers and prosecutors.
Among them was Alexander Dunlop, who said he was arrested while going to pick up sushi.
Last week, he discovered that there were two versions of the same police tape: the one that was to be used as evidence in his trial had been edited at two spots, removing images that showed Mr. Dunlop behaving peacefully. When a volunteer film archivist found a more complete version of the tape and gave it to Mr. Dunlop's lawyer, prosecutors immediately dropped the charges and said that a technician had cut the material by mistake.

Here's the story, and a good editorial on what happened.

Video evidence is clearly an important addition to the search for truth in today's courtroom. For the 1,800 people arrested last summer, most of the charges were dropped. About 400 have provided independent videos in their defense. The videos provide protection – for the police against false brutality complaints and for the defendants against false disorderly conduct charges.

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