White House practices transparency: two new developments

White House practices transparency: two new developments

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Maybe the headlines say it all:

Stimulus Plan Ensures Boom Sector: Oversight

Obama Bans Gimmicks, and Deficit Will Rise

The deal is that people will actually look at how we spend the money, which is the opposite approach from the previous administration.

Also, we're seeing a more honest figure regarding how bad our deficit is, largely hidden before by the prior big-spending administration.

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4 Comments

Pat Ahaesy

Although we are hearing some pretty scary news, at least we are hearing as close to the truth as they dare let us know. Transparency and oversight may be difficult to swallow, not kowing the truth and having parameters and its impact on behavior is far worse.

John Thacker

Also, we're seeing a more honest figure regarding how bad our deficit is, largely hidden before by the prior big-spending administration.
Accounting for Iraq and Afghanistan in the regular budget is welcome honesty and transparency. Pretending that Iraq spending was set to remain exactly the same until 2019, so that it decreasing is a "cut" in expected spending, is not.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/02/26/AR2009022600783.html?hpid=topnews
The new big-spending administration is going to increase spending even more quickly than the previous big-spending administration, judging by this budget bill. (Yes, it's the FY2009 budget. It raises discretionary spending by some 7.5%. The reason it didn't get passed before, and there were continuing resolutions, is that Bush threatened to veto it. Divided government is good.)
The budget also decides not to assume that two-thirds of the TARP money will be repaid, so $700 billion for bank purchases goes as $250 B in deficit. I certainly hope so, but it's hard to tell.

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