Beth Noveck, US deputy CTO, on open gov't

Beth Noveck, US deputy CTO, on open gov't

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Hey, Beth's the real deal, doing a lot behind the scenes to make online democracy real.

HT to techPresident.com

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One Comment

Tanya

Interesting set of comments. I have to disagree though with the assumption that there is going to be significantly increased overhead through incorporation of a feedback loop. Maybe there isn't any free lunch but technology allows you to have a really cheap lunch. The whole promise of Web 2.0 rests on the fundamental assumption that you can get improved governance at the same costs or lower costs. For instance Kundra said that the costs were close to zero for the Apps for Democracy (DC). And they did provid value. The way to go about doing this IMHO would be pick simple but high visibility government services, for instance DC DMV in DC, devise a simple system of citizen feedback (could be Twitter, could be Digg style feedback or Yelp-like but preferably using existing tools and existing user bases) and let it loose on the public. If there is sufficient amount of electronicprint/newsprint devoted to it, and ideally even a couple of mini-Sunlight foundation type watchdog, this could work. And work really well. Most complaints with the public sector deal with "oh there's no profit margin to motivate desired behavior". I completely agree but done right, a good substitute is public attention and involvement.

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