Red Cross Summit: using online tech better

Red Cross Summit: using online tech better

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4286746712_f8081330aa Hey, people are really using social media to call for help. At craigslist during Katrina, etc, we saw a lot of people asking for help, lots offering help, and connecting successfully.

A lot of people are getting together in Washington soon to step it up, check this out:

Social media has radically changed how people communicate, including their calls
for help. As we have seen in Haiti and other smaller disasters, now, people Tweet,
add a Facebook status or text about a natural disaster. And they expect a response.
Emergency and disaster response organizations are working to develop a process to
address this and harness the communication power of new media.


To meet this growing challenge, the American Red Cross is launching an initiative
to address how to reply to these digital cries for help more effectively.  This
includes an Emergency Social Data Summit on Thursday August 12, 2010, in
Washington, D.C with government agencies,
emergency management professionals, disaster response organizations, tech companies
and concerned citizens. There is also an online blog/white paper discussion of the
issue
.

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5 Comments

Douglas Bryce

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I think Craig is doing a good thing here, but I worry, as someone who has more direct professional contact with the phenomenon in government and all other large human organizations, how we cull the 8% of humans who are psychopaths from continually crowding into the ranks of power? Until that happens, I fear that real, positive and ennobling changes in the human condition (through large organizations) will be as Simon Bolivar said of bringing democracies to South American countries: "It is like ploughing the sea."
Thus I think that decentralization, disempowerment and defunding of most organizations and return of stolen personal sovereignty may be the best means, as well as the best end.
Ghandi did this relatively peacefully, but he missed the part about disempowering the top organizations – or was murdered before he could finish the job. Jefferson understood it but was outvoted by the Hamilton crowd. Cincinnatus understood it but was destined to be a near legendary exception.
Here is an example of what I mean: Serious students of wholistic medicine will tell you that American medicine is off track in many or most areas, emergency medicine being a shining exception. (That field has near instantaneous feedback, and is heavily funded by wartime "research and training". Mainly, though, they either do it right or the failure of their methods is immediately obvious.)
How is this? Entrenched powerful interests perpetuate it, including Big Law (I am a lawyer, so I know,) Big Pharma, Big Hospital, Big AMA, Big Medical Supply, Big Medicare, Big Medicaid, Big Medical, Big Insurance, Big Education, Big Nursing Home Associations, Social Security, FDA, and the Big Agra, Big Labor, Big Business and Big Media, whose collective advertising revenues may be as much as 75% from the aforesaid entities. Overlaying it all is the handful of financial institutions which actually run most of the World.
Absent new and effective checks, balances and screening methods, we can remediate this, but only by disempowering the institutions, in my view.
The proven peaceful way is noncooperation in many forms. As soon as we start our own powerful institutions, they will begin to be infiltrated by the usual suspect, unless we find new ways to remediate that. Perhaps MRI tests would reveal, along with aptitude tests, who is not a reliable fit for a leadership role. Then the countermeasure would be rigging the tests. And so forth – As long as there is a brass ring of power, sex, money or other undesireable motivation involved.
What do you think?
Doug

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