6 Women Making Waves for Social Justice in Tech

6 Women Making Waves for Social Justice in Tech


tech social justice

Folks, my teams and I have been following your comments about women in the tech sector that you really admire.

We've researched many of the women you've shared, and appreciate the time you took to mention 'em. The following is a list of women who really have their boots on the ground, all suggestions from comments. Please keep 'em coming. And maybe follow these women who are doing a lot of work for social good in the tech arena.

1. Selena Deckelmann, A major contributor to PostgreSQL and a Data Architect at Mozilla. She’s been involved with free and open source software since 1995 and began running conferences for PostgreSQL in 2007. In 2012, she founded PyLadiesPDX, a Portland chapter of PyLadies. Selena also founded Open Source Bridge and Postgres Open, and speaks internationally about open source, databases, and community when she's not keeping chickens and giving technical talks.

2. Leslie Hawthorn, Community Manager at Elasticsearch, where she leads community relations efforts. Leslie's spent the past decade creating, cultivating, and enabling open source communities. She created the world’s first initiative to involve pre-university students in open source software development, launched Google’s #2 Developer Blog, received an O’Reilly Open Source Award in 2010, and gave a few great talks on many things open source.

3. Deb Nicholson, Director of Community Outreach for the Open Invention Network, works at the intersection of technology and social justice. She's been a free speech advocate, economic justice organizer and civil liberties defender. After working in Massachusetts politics for fifteen years, Deb became involved in the free software movement.

She's the Community Outreach Director at the Open Invention Network and the Community Manager at Media Goblin. She also serves on the board at Open Hatch, a non-profit dedicated to matching prospective free software contributors with communities, tools and education.

(We could not find a Twitter account for Deb Nicholson…)

4. Elizabeth Krumbach Joseph, Automation and Tools Engineer at Hewlett-Packard on the OpenStack Infra team. Elizabeth's also a Community Council member for Ubuntu and a Board Member for Partimus, an organization that puts Linux hardware in schools.

5. Keila Banks, A web designer, programmer, videographer, and publisher of content making use of mostly open source software. She speaks to audiences of adults and youth alike on being raised in a family filled with technology and how she uses Linux and open source software in ways that will challenge you to ask yourself, are you smarter than a 5th grade open source user?

(We could not find a Twitter account for Keila Banks…)

6. Val Aurora, Co-Founder  and Executive Director of the Ada Initiative, a nonprofit that seeks to increase women's participation in the free culture movement, open source technology, and open source culture. Val's a writer, programmer, and feminist activist, and speaks about women in open technology and culture, feminism, and harassment. She also co-founded Double Union, a feminist hackerspace in San Francisco



Phillip Banks

Keila Banks is my daughter so you can reach her via my twitter. @banksps Thank you so much for this. She is super excited!


I wanted to be a computer programmer but fell through the cracks.
Now I have a teen daughter who is interested but how do I keep her from
falling through the cracks too? I'm a single Mom of 3 with limited resources
to help her reach her dreams.

CK Hayek

You might want to talk with a counselor at your daughter's school and ask them if the school has a STEM (Sciences, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) program with an emphasis on getting girls interested/involved in STEM careers.

Dr. John L. Eaarl

Then it IS true, The apple does NOT fall, far from the tree!
Congrats. to you and wife.

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