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Do eCommerce Giving Programs Effectively Raise Money for Charity?

Hey, the idea behind craigconnects is giving the voiceless a real voice, and the powerless real power. I see it as everyone doing some small, or big, part.

One way to do this is by giving back via purchases and a few key initiatives.  Organizations like We-Care.com team up with merchants and give a percentage of the proceeds to charity. We-Care works with more than 2500 online merchants, and it's the merchants who choose what percentage of proceeds to donate (ranging from 1.5% to 15% of transactions). Participation doesn't cost anything for the organizations, and there is no extra charge for the person who is shopping. Something that's really useful on We-Care is their toolbar plugin. You can download a reminder that will pop up each time you're shopping on a site that will give some money to your cause.

Amazon just started doing something similar to We-Care, but aren't giving as much (just 0.5%). They're calling it AmazonSmile.

Perla Ni, CEO of Great Nonprofits commented on Amazon's new giving program, and what she calls "interesting benchmarks" -

"0.5% is an interesting percentage. Amazon's revenue was $17B last quarter. It would be $80M/quarter if everybody who purchased something took it up. Even though it doesn't cost anyone to do it, say 20% of users sign up, so that would be $20M/quarter. That would be about $80M/year donated to nonprofits. Google gives about $100M/year and Wells Fargo gives about $300M/year."

Efforts like these are making donations an every day thing, and this way, according to Perla, "nonprofits may see donations through-out the year, rather than just at the end of the year for tax-deductions." Perla does voice a concern though. She says: "the biggest potential downside I see is that it may cannibalize individual giving – 'oh, I don't need to give on my own, because I've already done it just by shopping.' It may make shopping replace giving."

We also contacted Ken Berger, President and CEO of Charity Navigator, about AmazonSmile to get his opinion. He said that Charity Navigator will be looking into the project to see if Amazon will use their API to display the Charity Navigator ratings.

Ken also shared with us that "shopping portals that give money to charity usually don’t generate enough revenue to make a big impact on an individual charity’s bottom line. One of the problems is the change of behavior required – same as with Amazon since customers will have to start their purchase process on a different website than the regular Amazon site. However, the scale of Amazon makes this a unique proposition with the potential to make a big impact on a charity’s bottom line."

I think the most helpful thing you can do to make sure you're giving to the good guys is to check out Guidestar, Charity Navigator, and Great Nonprofits (like Yelp for nonprofits, with user reviews). These will help you select good, effective nonprofits.

GNP

I support some nonprofits, and some not (more on that here). I make sure to look into a charity before I donate to avoid giving to one of America's 50 worst charities. It's useful to be able to give back to orgs that I support via purchases that I'm already making. Although, I don't think that shopping should replace giving to an org when you believe in their cause.

How are you giving back, if you're able?

My First Job: What Big Blue Once Was

My first real job was at IBM, in the old Boca Raton lab, in 1976. (Important: IBM has become a very different company in the last twenty years, so please assume none of this applies to the current company. Also, this is all to my recollection, and memory is unreliable.)

chunk

The offer was made early, and sounded great. I've never been in love with the beach, but thought it might be fun to live near the ocean, and live in a city whose name means "mouse's mouth."

The job was in "advanced technology" and dealt with systems architecture.

It took a few years to sink in, but turns out that in corporate language, "advanced tech" is a euphemism: It isn't what it sounds like. But the software design process didn't include asking actual customers about usability. I discovered later on, through founding craigslist, that listening to people is about the smartest thing you can do.

I got involved in some software development. That led to some customer involvement, but I was too easy to read, and customers looked to my reactions to see if marketing was, say, stretching things. We nerds are not great salespeople.

After some years, the opportunity to transfer to IBM in Detroit was made, to be involved in a joint effort with General Motors to do factory automation work. Well, I took the offer.

Detroit was pretty good for me, I liked the people and got involved with the local science fiction community, and the local artists community.

After a total of seventeen years, IBM was going through a lot of changes. I took a really good buyout offer and ended up moving to San Francisco, where I got another job and a few years later started craigslist in my spare time.

Photo: Adam Jenkins/Flickr

Texas government working hard to prevent women from voting

Folks, we are gearing up for midterm elections and that means that you should be aware of your rights. wendy-davis-e1382019677722

There are some real bad actors out there trying to implement laws to stop eligible people, including women, from voting. What I learned in high school civics class is that an attack on voting rights is virtually the same as an attack on the country.

The New Civil Rights Movement writes, as reported by Think Progress:

"as of November 5, Texans must show a photo ID with their up-to-date legal name. It sounds like such a small thing, but according to the Brennan Center for Justice, only 66% of voting age women have ready access to a photo document that will attest to proof of citizenship. This is largely because young women have not updated their documents with their married names, a circumstance that doesnʼt affect male voters in any significant way. Suddenly 34% of women voters are scrambling for an acceptable ID, while 99% of men are home free."

Some politicians have tried to manipulate voting laws for their benefit, that's not right. We need integrity in our elections and voting that's free, fair, and accessible.

It's up to us all to ensure the integrity of our voting process by getting registered, speaking up against voter ID laws and the attack on voting rights, and to encourage everyone to vote, regardless of ethnicity or gender.

Disenfranchising voters is not a new thing, but has been happening across the country for some time now. Last year, I worked with some good folks to create an infographic about impact of voter suppression.

Capture

My team and I have compiled a list of voting resources; please check it out, and share any helpful resources that you think are missing in the comment section.

15 Women in Tech to Follow on Twitter

Hey, a coupla weeks ago I wrote a blog post about the Top 10 Women in Tech orgs. And recently, a lot of folks have been talking about the importance of women's leadership in tech. The Women's Media Center released a report with two big data points:

  • At its current pace, it will take until 2085 for women to reach parity with men in leadership roles in government/politics, business, entrepreneurship, and nonprofits.
  • Only 17 women at media and technology companies are on Fortune’s 50 most powerful women in business list.

I'm no expert, but I do have suggestions for some women in tech who really have their boots on the ground, and are doing good work. You should check out their work, support 'em if you're able, and follow them on Twitter.

craig16womenintech

(in alphabetical order…)

Kimberly Bryant, @6Gems: Founder of Black Girls Code. Black Girls Code purpose is to increase the number of women of color in the digital space by empowering girls of color ages 7 to 17 to become innovators in STEM fields, leaders in their communities, and builders of their own futures through exposure to computer science and technology. Kimberly is an engineer, social entrepreneur, technology junkie, and dreamer.


6gems

Shaherose Charania, @shaherose: CEO, Co-Founder, and President of Women 2.0. At heart Shaherose is a mobile and telephony junkie. She’s led new consumer products at Ribbit (BT). Previously, she was Director of Product Management at Talenthouse and JAJAH (sold to Telefonica/O2). Shaherose holds a B.A. in Business Admin from The University of Western Ontario’s Richard Ivey School of Business.


shaherose

Sara Chipps, @SaraJChipps: Co-Founder, software developer, and organizer of Girl Develop It, which teaches women how to develop applications from start to finish. The org empowers women of diverse backgrounds from around the world to learn how to develop software. Sara is also the CTO of Levo League, where she focuses on developer happiness as a metric for success.


sarajchipps

Kaliya Hamlin, @identitywoman: Founder of She's Geeky, which began as a haven where women who self-identify as geeky could meet in person to support, educate, and share experiences with one another. Kaliya is also Founder of the Personal Data Ecosystem, and is one of the leading experts in the emerging personal data ecosystem and user-centric digital identity.


identitywoman

Mary Hodder, @Maryhodder: Mary works in privacy and personal data technologies, and is also working on an Android rewrite for privacy (with crowdfunding to finance it). She founded Dabble.com in 2005, a social search site that helps people organize and playlist media they like, while discovering great media through other's recommendations.


maryhodder

Allyson Kapin, @womenwhotech: Founder of Women Who Tech and Rad Campaign, a web agency that develops websites for nonprofit organizations, foundations, and political campaigns. Allyson is also the co-author of the book Social Change Anytime Everywhere, published by Wiley. Allyson has been a featured expert on media outlets ranging from CNN to the BBC for her insight on tech and social media trends.


womenwhotech

Sian Morson, @xianamoy: Founder and CEO of Kollective Mobile, a mobile development agency that helps start-ups design and grow their mobile business by providing strategy consulting and building mobile apps. A graduate of NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, Sian makes video art, speaks about technology and mobile, and writes about culture and tech.


xianamoy

Holly Ross, @drupalhross: Executive Director of the Drupal Association, an educational nonprofit organization that fosters and supports the Drupal software project, the community, and its growth. Holly has a passion for change and has led a career focused on helping nonprofits create more of it.


drupalhross

Rashmi Sinha, @Rashmi: Co-Founder of SlideShare which was acquired by LinkedIn. Rashmi focuses on product strategy and design. Before SlideShare, she built MindCanvas, a game-like survey platform for customer research. Rashmi has a PhD in Cognitive Neuropsychology from Brown University and conducted research on search engines and recommender systems at UC Berkeley.


rashmi

Wendy Tan, @wendytanwhite: Co-Founder & CEO of Moonfruit, a design-control DIY website and shop builder; recently acquired by Hibu. Wendy is also a 500 Startups mentor. Wendy writes extensively about the need for greater support and recognition for female entrepreneurs and women in business.


wendytanwhite

Amra Tareen, @amratareen: CEO of LittleCast, a mobile app and web platform that allows users to sell videos directly on Facebook. Prior to LittleCast, Amra, a former telecom engineer who grew up in Pakistan and Australia, earned a Harvard M.B.A., then joined venture capital outfit Sevin Rosen Funds, where she became a partner, and then left when she founded AllVoices, a citizen news site.


amratareen

Kristy Tillman@KristyT: Designer, Developer, and a Media Ideation Fellow. Kristy is building Project Phonebooth, a mobile app that aims to make applying to local government jobs easier for those who rely on mobile technology to access the Internet.


kristyt

Padmasree Warrior, @padmasree: CTO of Cisco. Padmasree helps direct technology and operational innovation across the company and oversees strategic partnerships, mergers and acquisitions, the integration of new business models, the incubation of new technologies, and the cultivation of world-class technical talent.


padmasree

Dr. Umit Yalcinalp, @umityalcinalp: Dr. Umit Yalcinalp is a former Software Architect turned Salesforce.com Evangelist with a Ph.D. in Computer Science, and is a self-described “seasoned technologist, fashionista geek and web technology veteran.” You can read Dr Yalcinalp’s blog at WS Dudette.


umityalcinalp

 

Who would you like to see on this list? Let me know in the comment section. Thanks!

 

Managing Stress During Gov't Shutdown

Hey, Rosemary Freitas Williams, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Military Community and Family Policy, discusses her concerns with rising stress during the gov't shutdown, and she refers to available resources. She talks about Managing During Stressful Times. The DoD's focusing on resources that are available to help military families deal with the challenges of the shutdown. It's a really stressful time for folks, and it's important to know that there are good people out there who are willing to help out.

UntitledRosemary says:

"As the government shutdown continues, I am in awe of the patience and resolve shown by members of the military community. We have all been touched by the recent furlough. I know that some of our military families depend on a spouse's paycheck to help make ends meet. Additionally, some spouses are among the many federal employees waiting at home for the government shutdown to end. There is the lingering issue of the possible paycheck delays. Despite all these challenges – as always – you are managing these new challenges with characteristic resourcefulness and resilience. [...]

Most of us like to think that we can manage on our own, but reaching out for support is so critically important for our overall health and well-being. We are strong as individuals but stronger as a community, caring for each other and helping each other through even the most challenging of times. Reaching out for support – to a family member, a friend, a chaplain, the installation military and family support center, or Military OneSource – means you have the strength to recognize when new information, resources or skills will help you through life’s challenges. But it is up to you to seek assistance if you need it and to know where to refer someone if they are experiencing unhealthy stress.

We are here to help. [...]

To learn more about confidential non-medical counseling and financial consultation options call Military OneSource at 800-342-9647 or contact your installation military and family support center. To locate installation and JFSAP programs near you, visit MilitaryINSTALLATIONS."

Read the full article here. More to come…

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