10 women entrepreneurs to follow on Twitter

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Folks, my team and I have listened to many of the suggestions you’ve been sending our way, and we’ve compiled a list of 10 women entrepreneurs that you should follow on Twitter. These women really have their boots on the ground, and are doing good work. Please comment below to share your favorite women entrepreneurs.

Majora Carter

Majora Carter is an internationally renowned urban revitalization strategy consultant, real estate developer, and Peabody Award winning broadcaster. She’s responsible for the creation & successful implementation of numerous green-infrastructure projects, policies, and job training & placement systems.
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Heather Russell

Heather Russell told TechHub that she became an entrepreneur because “My parents are artists and writers and always had their own business. From ad agency to travel agency. I just grew up without a concept of working for someone else and to do your own thing, your own way.”//

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Aliza Sherman

Aliza Sherman helped pave the way for women online and in the Internet industry. She is a web and social mobile pioneer whose work helped shape the early new media industry. In addition to starting the first woman-owned Internet company in the early 90s, Cybergrrl, Inc., she’s been writing, speaking and consulting about social media since 2006 and social mobile marketing since 2010. She is also well known for her expertise on women’s technology and business issues.

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Natalia Oberti Noguera

Natalia Oberti Noguera is Founder and CEO of Pipeline Fellowship, an angel investing bootcamp for women that’s changing the face of angel investing and creating capital for women social entrepreneurs.
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Melinda Emerson

Melinda Emerson, known as SmallBizLady, has been a thriving entrepreneur for nearly 15 years and is an internationally known keynote speaker. A pioneer in social media marketing, she’s the creator and host of #Smallbizchat, the longest running live chat on Twitter for small business owners.
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Arianna Huffington

Arianna Huffington is the Chair, President, and editor-in-chief of the Huffington Post Media Group, a nationally syndicated columnist, and author of fourteen books. In May 2005, she launched The Huffington Post, a news and blog site that quickly became one of the most widely-read, linked to, and frequently-cited media brands on the Internet.
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Susan Wojcicki

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Susan Wojcicki is the CEO of YouTube. Previously, she was the Senior Vice President of Advertising & Commerce at Google. She oversaw the design, innovation and engineering of Google’s advertising, commerce, and measurement platform products, including AdWords, AdSense, DoubleClick, Offers, and Google Analytics.

 

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Marissa Mayer

Marissa Mayer is the current President and CEO of Yahoo! since July 2012. Previously, she was a long-time executive and key spokesperson for Google.
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Helene Gayle

Helene Gayle joined CARE USA as president and CEO in 2006. Prior to her current position, she was the director of the HIV, TB, and reproductive health program for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.
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Ellen Degeneres

Ellen DeGeneres is a stand-up comedian, television host, and actress. She starred in the popular sitcom Ellen from 1994 to 1998 and has hosted the syndicated talk show The Ellen DeGeneres Show since 2003, going on its 11th year.
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10 Women Run Startups You Should Know

Folks, there are a lot of really good businesses out there, and my team and I want to highlight 10 women run startups that you should really know about. These startups are doing great work and really getting the jobs done in their arenas. We took a little bit from each org’s website to capture what they’re doing in their own words. Make sure to visit their sites, support ’em, and follow ’em on Twitter. These women are really changing the world.

 

Infographic by Women Who Tech
Infographic by Women Who Tech
  1. CyPhy Works: Helen Grenier, CEO

    (Please note that we used Helen Grenier’s Twitter account because CyPhy Works’s doesn’t appear to have an account.)

    CyPhy Works research starts with people -They look to the places where people need empowering technology to reach beyond what they currently can. Then they turn their attention to scouring the market landscape and literature to see what, if any, un-utilized research can be leveraged to enable the people in need. Once they fully understand what people need, and what people have done to address that need, they focus their attention in their labs where their people develop transformational technologies that make it possible for people in need to achieve their goals more efficiently and more effectively than the status quo would allow.

  2. DailyWorth: Amanda Steinberg, Founder & CEO

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    DailyWorth says, “We’re closing the income gap by enabling women to reach their maximum earning potential.We’re closing the wealth gap by empowering women to invest and build wealth to fund the lives they want.We’re helping women get the most value for their money, whether they’re purchasing products that enrich their lives, supporting causes they care about or investing in companies they believe in.We publish exclusive, expert content daily to more than one million female financial decision makers. Explore the website and sign up to get our tips and tools delivered daily to your inbox.”
  3.  Plum Alley: Deborah Jackson, Founder & CEO

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    “I founded Plum Alley for women to create products, build companies and enhance their esteem and wealth. We offer 3 things: a way for women to raise money for projects, hire experts to help them, and provide a way to sell their products with an emphasis on their story.”
  4. ThinkUp: Gina Trapani, Co-Founder

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    ThinkUp is a brand new app that connects your Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or other social networking accounts and tells you what matters about the time you spent there. ThinkUp can help you have more fun with friends, connect better with your network, and even learn a little bit about yourself. ThinkUp is also our new company, focused on the idea that people are looking for tech companies they can trust. We’re putting our users and community first, because we think that’s the best way to create a better web for everyone.
  5. LightSail Energy: Danielle Fong, Co Founder & Chief Scientist

    (Please note that we used Danielle Fong’s Twitter account because LightSail’s doesn’t appear to be in use.)

    LightSail aims to produce the world’s cleanest and most economical energy storage systems. Compressing air creates heat energy. Until now, this was wasted, drastically reducing efficiency.LightSail isdeveloping breakthrough, high efficiency energy storage systems using compressed air. Our key insight: rapidly capturing the heat of compression with a water spray.

  6. Tech Cocktail: Jen Consalvo, COO

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    Tech Cocktail is a media company and events organization for startups, entrepreneurs, and technology enthusiasts. Since 2006, its goal has been to amplify local tech communities and give entrepreneurs a place to get informed, get connected, and get inspired. Tech Cocktail dedicates itself to covering news, how-to’s, up-and-coming startups, and industry trends online, and hosting events in over 20 cities in the US and abroad.
  7. uBeam: Meredith Perry, Founder

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    In 2012, Meredith Perry took on $750k in seed funding to build out uBeam’s technology for wirelessly charging electronic devices. uBeam transmits power over the air to charge electronic gadgets wirelessly. It’s like Wi-Fi for energy.
  8. Angaza Design, Inc: Lesley Marincola, Founder & CEO

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    Globally, more than 1.2 billion people live outside the reach of an electricity grid. Consumers in this off-grid world spend hundreds of dollars each year to light their homes and power small electronics, and they do so using expensive sources of energy such as kerosene lanterns and disposable batteries. Modern options such as photovoltaic solar cost far less when amortized over time, but the comparatively high upfront price of these energy alternatives has kept them out of this enormous market.The Angaza Pay-As-You-Go platform enables distributors and manufacturers of energy products to offer pricing that reaches 1.2 billion consumers in the off-grid world.
  9. InVenture: Shivani Siroya, Founder & CEO

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    The Problem? There are almost 400 million low-income and unbanked individuals that cannot access basic financial services due to a lack of credit scores.

    InVenture’s Approach? InVenture facilitates financial access for low-income individuals and the unbanked by creating the world’s first credit scoring service enabled by their SMS accounting tool, InSight.

    Their Impact? InVenture creates a fair market by taking the data collected through InSight and shares this information with lending institutions to help individuals qualify for and access affordable financial services tailored to their needs.

  10. Embrace Innovations: Jane Chen, Co Founder & Chief Business Officer

    // Embrace is a healthcare tech company that provides a line of innovative, affordable, and high quality medical devices for emerging markets. Their vision is to empower the disadvantaged to improve their lives through disruptive technologies.

 

Who would you add to this list? My team and I would love to hear about some other great women owned startups.

5 Free Tools To Track Social Media Engagement

I’m frequently asked by good orgs that I support to share their work, and sometimes they ask me the best way to track the engagement that’s occurred. I’ve compiled a list of some free tracking tools that can really benefit you personally, or that can help out your org. These could be especially useful with all of the end-of-year campaigns coming up (including the CrowdRise Holiday Challenge that I’m helping to fund).

5 Free Tracking Tools to Help You Out:

1.  bitly – bitly is a great way for you to shorten links and then track their click through rates. If you sign up for an account, you can store all of the links that you’ve shortened, and then track how well the link is performing with your audience. It’s possible to shorten links without signing up for an account, but if you get a free account, you’ll be able to access historical data.

bitly

Just click “view stats” and you’ll have insight into:

  • How many times the link has been clicked;
  • The percentage of clicks;
  • The number of bitly links that have been created from your original URL, and who created them (if the person has a public account);
  • The date that the link was clicked, and an hourly breakdown;
  • What social media platforms the bitly was shared on;
  • Where the link was shared geographically, and where the most clicks were coming from;

2.  Topsy – Topsy allows you to analyze conversations in realtime, and  provides instant social insight. You can analyze any topic, term, or hashtag.

topsy

Once you conduct your search, you’ll have access to a few different stats:

  • All web mentions of your term, topic, or hashtag – or you can specify that Topsy just shows you links, Tweets, photos, videos, or influencers that relate to your search;
  • You can sort by language;
  • You can sort by relevance, newest, or oldest;
  • You are able to view the Tweets per day that mention your search, and from there you can view top Tweets;
  • Topsy reveals how many Tweets mention your search over the past 15 days, and it provides a Topsy sentiment score;
  • You can chart replies to your Twitter handle and view when the most people are responding, and what they’re saying;

3.  Twubs – If you plan on hosting a tweetchat or having a hashtag livestream at an event, Twubs allows you to register a hashtag. Once you register the hashtag, you can update event details or hashtag details and create a page for your particular hashtag. Once the page is setup, you can set up a main account (i.e. your org’s Twitter handle) for the hashtag that will show up in a different, prime stream.

twubs

Other features include:

  • Scheduling Twitter Chats that will show up in Twub’s global calendar;
  • Adding additional hashtags to stream on your main hashtag page;
  • Customizing your hashtag page to match your branding;
  • Watching the livestream of your Tweets as people use your hashtag;
  • Adding websites that may be relevant to your hashtag;
  • Allowing other folks to be admins for your particular Twubs hashtag;
  • Blocking trolls and spammers (don’t feed the trolls!), as well as blocking words that you don’t want included in the stream;
  • A moderated fullscreen feed module that allows you to control a customizable fullscreen display of Tweets that you can project anywhere;

4.  Twitter Counter – Twitter Counter is a really good site to track your Twitter stats.

twittercounter

The free version will track:

  • How many followers you have and how many you are following;
  • Your increase of followers over a period of time (you can choose the time period);
  • Comparisons between you and your competitors or partners;
  • Increases or decreases in followers, Tweets, and folks you are following from the previous day;
  • Your daily average follows, tweets, and following;

5.   socialmention* – Similar to Topsy, socialmention* allows for real-time social media searches and analysis, but has more filters for types of medium . The site will show you trends underneath the search bar if you’re interested in perusing, or you can type in your own trend that you want to search. For example, if you want to type in keywords from a blog post you published last week, or the name of your org, you’ll get a variety of results.

socialmention

Results will show you:

  • socialmention*’s perceived sentiment of the keyword or phrase you typed in;
  • The last time the search phrase was mentioned;
  • A list of top related keywords;
  • The top users who have mentioned the search phrase;
  • How many unique authors are talking about it;
  • The top related hashtags;
  • The sources from which the results were pulled;

 

What tools have you found to be useful, folks?

“The Baroque Cycle”: The Moment I Realized History RTs Itself

Around ten years ago, I read this historical fiction trilogy by a really influential science fiction writer, Neal Stephenson.
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At that point I had relinquished all management control of the site I started, was doing pretty intense customer service, and I was thinking about what it all meant.

My nerdly take is that The Baroque Cycle’s about the invention of the modern world, in the social normalization of attitudes and inventions including:

  • The Enlightenment perspective
  • Scientific method
  • Calculus as a possible “system of the world”
  • Representative democracy
  • Revolution via social media

It influenced the way I think about my own creation, and to cut to the chase…

Baroque Cycle helped me understand how “history retweets itself,” how people use social media to get big things done. Over time, human social contracts evolve via punctuated equilibrium wherein things slowly get better.

Improvements are not continuous, though. Normally, things are in balance, equilibrium, until we hit some kind of tipping point, which punctuate the flow of history. That’s something I learned from Victor Hugo, as often paraphrased: “Nothing is as powerful as an idea whose time has come.”

Until recently, the cost of getting your idea out there was very high; you needed your own printing press, or maybe TV station.

However, the Internet changes all that.

The way I look ahead and plan was substantially altered. My focus is not only getting stuff done in the here and now, but I’m considering what I learn and how it affects stuff in the long term (twenty years) and the longer term (two hundred years.) The work done by the historical figures in the trilogy are still playing out today.

(Yes, I’m writing in a far more nerdly manner than I’ve written in years, and to be clear, I’m going old-school nerd here.)

Okay, specifically, Baroque Cycle helped me understand a lot about the way people and history work. For example, I finally began to understand the ways that social media has been used, throughout history, to change the social contract and how we govern ourselves.

Specifically, I realized that people including John Locke (not the LOST guy) and others used blogging to effect the Glorious Revolution of 1688. It was (relatively) bloodless and short, and least compared to the preceding Civil Wars and for that matter, compared to the Wars of the Roses, etc.

The books helped me understand how the Glorious Revolution led to bloggers including Ben Franklin and Tom Paine, who helped create American independence and our own form of representative democracy. Then, I realized how Martin Luther blogged his way to major religious and social change. He used the efforts of a nerd, a guy Johannes Gutenberg, to great effect. (Gutenberg got great stuff done, but it was Luther who got big stuff done; Gutenberg also learned about venture capitalists the hard way. check out Jeff Jarvis‘ “Gutenberg the Geek.”)

Then Robert Wright helped me understand how Saint Paul used the social media of his time to get the word out regarding Christianity.

More recently, The Writing on the Wall by Thomas Standage documents all of this, from the Roman Republic through now. (Spoiler: looks to me that Julius Caesar was not only a blogger re the conquest of Gaul, but he kinda invented journalism in its most literal sense.)

The deal is that The Baroque Cycle helped me get this on a gut level, and that’s inspired all of my subsequent efforts.

In Stephenson’s book we see how people, working together, separately, and sometimes in competition, how they created major tipping points which came together in a perfect storm to create the modern world. (Sorry to invoke the cliche.)

Added to this, I think I finally understood what a latter-day Martin Luther meant by “The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends towards justice.” My take is that he was talking about what the books teach.

So, ten years ago I started to internalize all this and to figure out what to do about it, acknowledging that, well, I’m a nerd. Helping along a global tipping point is not in the nerd job description, which requires a lot of charisma, energy, and a lot of intuition to understand of the way people work.

However, the nature of the Internet suggests we’re not looking at the “strong man theory of history” anymore. Real and massive change will come from people who learn to lead by example, through their ideas, and from some intuitive knowledge of how to move ahead with ideas whose time has come.

I love The Baroque Cycle and recommend everything by Stephenson. However, it’s way more important to act on what it depicts, and my deal is to try to give a voice to people who never had one, and then to share their work. My stuff to date gives me a bit of a bully pulpit that I don’t need for myself. However, I use it on a daily basis to get the word out on behalf other others.

My joke, occasionally tweeted, is that I retweet a lot because 1) it’s good to share, and 2) it spares me the burden of original thought. Well, #2 has some truth to it, but #1 is the big deal for me, inspired by the actions depicted by Stephenson.

altruism3

That’s not altruistic as I view it. I guess it’s just a reflection of the abnormal social affect and dysfunction of myself and sometimes of my nerdly peers.

After all, a nerd’s gotta do what a nerd’s gotta do.

Trustworthy journalism in a fact-checking-free world

Getting real about trustworthy journalism

Okay, I really just want news I can trust.

Couple years ago, I blurted out that “the press should be the immune system of democracy.”

Personally, I really don’t like being lied to, but my deal here is that our social contract with the news business is that they hold the powerful to account.

In return, we buy the products of news outlets, and give news professionals certain protections, like the US First Amendment and shield laws.

That gives the press a lot of power, which means that the news industry itself needs to be accountable. That’s a lot easier said than done, and it’s only getting harder to do.

However, if a journalist or news outlet isn’t trustworthy, is it worth buying? Is it good for the country?

factcheck
Well, I’m not in the news business, I’m an outsider, but over years I’ve spent a lot of time with people in the business, and I’ve gotten glimpses as to how the sausage is made. That means I gotta respect boundaries, and not tell people how to do their job.

That job gets more and more challenging, and even good news orgs can have lapses. I’m good with that, if they fix those lapses and hold themselves otherwise accountable, in good faith. Sure, there’re legal consequences, but the bottom line is driven by trustworthy actions.

The solution involves:

Turns out that what we have now are a lot of ethics codes and policies, but very little accountability.

To make sense of this, here’s the kind of lapse I’m talking about, none of which seems to have been addressed.

1. NBC selectively edited a video and badly misrepresented a guy in a real ugly case. Not clear if they’ve come clean about it yet.

Suggestion: news outlets should make the full recording available, perhaps via a discreet rapid-response accountability team.

2. Sometimes a news outlet might broadcast a public figure lying, even when they know it’s a lie. This is what Jon Stewart calls the “CNN leaves it there” problem.

Suggestion: Reporters are smart, if they know they’re being lied to, don’t broadcast it. If they smell a lie but not sure, do a good faith fact-check.

3. Sometimes a news outlet does fact-checking and “forgets” to follow through. This has happened to me, but more importantly, happened to Jimmy Wales very recently, in the NY Times:

“It is very odd and filled with a lot of basic factual errors. For example, it says that Wikipedia was run out of a strip mall at one point – that’s just completely false and a very weird thing to have said, particularly since I explained to the fact checker that it was wrong!”

Suggestion: do fact-checking, and then, correct any falsehoods.

4. Sometimes multiple news outlets will report first, without fact-checking, doing a lot of damage. This was particularly true in the aftermath of the Boston Marathon attack.

Suggestion: confirm facts before publication.

5. Sometimes, news outlets don’t do their research, get a story badly wrong, and really hurts the country. This is very true regarding the recent IRS scandal, the real story is more about Congressional failure and that the IRS isn’t targeting enough possibly bogus charities.

Suggestion: use actual fact-checked research. Using other news reports as sources is not reliable. Reporting should be transparent about the political motivations of the people pushing the story. Specifically, journalists need to make sure they spend as much “good faith” time in exploring agendas as they do in seeking sources and exploring “the facts” they are made privy to.If so, the story would be perceived differently, perhaps accurately.

The news business is under considerable pressure, competing for a shrinking audience, often having to come up with many new stories per day. Sometimes the facts just can’t be checked, which is a big reason I keep talking about “good faith.”

My personal bias is that the news industry should create their own accountability tools. I don’t think they’ll be perfect, just looking for good faith action.

However, right now people are stirring the pot, constructively, suggesting that the government intervene.

Specifically, people are suggesting that “journalists” should have US First Amendment and shield law protections. Non-professionals, specifically “bloggers,” might be denied those protections.

I think that way of doing it is wrong, and that the issue isn’t “journalist vs. blogger” but whether or not the reporter and news outlet are accountable. Here, “accountable” means “acting in good faith to be trustworthy” which means having an ethics code and honestly trying hard to follow that code.

Does a journalist or news outlet without accountability have legal protections?

You can find a great summary by Mathew Ingram, which incorporates a lot of good work from Jillian York, Jeff Jarvis, David Weinberger, and others.

However, any news outlet that wants to succeed must be trustworthy, that is, accountable. I feel that’s required for their survival, and for national survival.

Perhaps people in news can suggest how they can get to actual accountability?

Why do you support women’s leadership as the next frontier?

Over the past twenty-seven years I’ve been quietly supporting women’s groups, just proceeding on what feels like the right thing to do. womens center

That started with HAVEN, a women’s shelter in the Oakland (Greater Detroit) area, probably in 1985. My intent was to become a volunteer counselor, since they needed guys in that role. However, with the briefest of training I learned that I was way too wimpy to help in that manner.

Fundraising, well, I was able to help out there, agreeing to help set up fundraising events, one including the sale of artwork. All I remember clearly is that inhaling Windex fumes, not a good idea. Also, when visiting, I had to be escorted while in the shelter. The latter was the first time that the idea of boundaries really sunk in. There are always places where a person isn’t welcome, with good reason.

Over the past ten years, people have asked me to help out with a number of causes, focusing on social media and sometimes cash. The deal is that I get involved on a daily basis when that’s constructive, and otherwise, I respect boundaries, far as I can tell.

Since I know something about computers and a little about small business, my focus has been on helping girls and women in technology as much as I’m able.

 

In no particular order, the groups I’ve worked with include:

craig's kiva loans to date by country

In the spirit of respecting boundaries I’m very quiet, unless I think I’m being funny, but I try to keep that in check.

Recently, I’ve joined the Women in Public Service Project, started by Hillary Clinton. They’ve challenged me: Why is women’s leadership important to public policy and entrepreneurship? Why do you support women’s leadership as the next frontier?

craig + hillary

Until then, I’d been winging it, just doing what felt right.

However, I guess I needed to better articulate it, so …

1. Fairness. Treat people like you want to be treated.

Personally, I’m a nerd, feel that life should be fair, that everyone gets a chance to be heard, and maybe to help run things.

Sure, life isn’t fair, but that won’t slow me down. A nerd’s gotta do what a nerd’s gotta do.

2. To generalize: Women listen and work with one another to brainstorm solutions. To speak lightly of that, consider the cultural stereotype, that women prefer to ask for directions whereas men often prefer to try to figure things out and then get lost.

Note to self: JUST LISTEN. That is, don’t ALWAYS attempt to solve the problem, SOMETIMES YOU JUST NEED TO LISTEN. (Courtesy of “You Just Don’t Understand” by Deborah Tannen.)

3. “The fastest way to change society is to mobilize the women of the world.” -Charles Malik

That is, we’re living in a very small period of tremendous social change, where the people who are best prepared, who have the best listening and cooperative skills should get their chance of running things. I don’t think we’ll see revolution, we’ll see a rebalancing of power, shifting from traditional sources of power (authority and money) to power based on the size and effectiveness of one’s network.

… and finally, to self, JUST LISTEN.

Sandy Hook Promise, an initiative to end gun violence in America

Folks, there are people in the tech community mobilizing to support an end to gun violence in America.

One month after the tragic mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, a group of Newtown, Connecticut citizens have organized to honor the lives lost by unveiling a national grassroots initiative committed to preventing similar tragedies from ever taking place again. The initiative’s a nonprofit called Sandy Hook Promise (SHP, formerly called “Newtown United”).

Sandy Hook Promise, www.sandyhookpromise.org

The folks that’ll be at the unveiling of Sandy Hook Promise today include members of SHP’s Executive Committee, participating victims’ families, survivors, first responders, and other community members to launch this important initiative.

This morning, Sandy Hook Promise will share its plans for how an end to gun violence will be worked toward. SHP is asking folks across the country to make a promise to encourage and support common sense solutions that make communities and our country safer from acts of violence like the tragedy on December 14, 2012.

The tech community’s combining its efforts directly with the Sandy Hook Promise organization, beyond the Causes Petition and the “Moment of Silence” efforts.

The families of Newtown-Sandy Hook also want us Post to Facebook and Tweet about the efforts using hashtag #sandyhookpromise beginning today, Monday, January 14. We must get all of America to sign the Sandy Hook Promise on the website.

Some sample Tweets:

    • Join me and people in Newtown in making the #sandyhookpromise to support common sense solutions to reduce gun violence at www.sandyhookpromise.org
    • I’m joining people in Newtown in making the #sandyhookpromise to protect our children and reduce gun violence. Join us at www.sandyhookpromise.org
    • Today, people in Newtown are making the #sandyhookpromise to reduce gun violence. Sign the pledge with me at www.sandyhookpromise.org

For live updates on the press conference follow @SandyHook on Twitter.

 

#One4One: surfacing people who you should know about

I go to a lot of tech conferences, and in conjunction with that, get added to notables lists, due to clerical errors.

Sometimes, it’s disappointing that the people on stage or in such lists aren’t really fair to some groups of people.

In particular, speaker and notables lists sometimes fail to include women whose voices are a real big deal when it comes to tech helping make life better for everyone.

A friend and trusted advisor, Andrew Rasiej (who helps run a very fair and effective Personal democracy Forum), took issue with his naming to Newsweek’s recent Digital 100 Power Index. It only listed eight women, not so fair, so he asked Deanna Zandt to take his place. (I’ve also worked with her, and she’s the real deal.)

Deanna and Andrew also created a simple Twitter game called #One4One to get the word out about others who really need their voices heard. Here’s my contribution:

okay, for ‪#One4One‬ I’d suggest @MonaEltahawy, Beth @Kanter, Allyson Kapin (@WomenWhoTech), @reshmasaujani, smart, real social change agents

(which I followed by admitting that I was sure I forgot some folks, but, really, I forget stuff.)

Tips on Sharing Facebook Posts & Twitter Tweets

Hey, I figure that sometimes people doing good stuff want me to spread the updates to my networks in social media, starting with Facebook and Twitter.

I tell ’em to email me the links to their posts, and maybe they should do so for all their supporters. Just send us the links with a few words as to what they’re talking about.

That means we can click on those links, and that brings up their posts in a browser. From there, we just click on Share or Retweet. Just two clicks, and the original post is sent throughout our networks.

Here’s how to send the link to a specific post:

For Facebook:

If you post something to Facebook (I have highlighted the screenshots in orange for the purposes of this blog post):

And want to share that post by way of linking to it directly (vs. clicking the “Share” button), you can click on the  grey time stamp that is located on the post (highlighted in orange below):

and once you click on that, it will take the post to a new window. In this window, you can either copy and paste the URL in the address bar, or right click the time stamp and click “Copy Link Location” from the drop-down menu, and then paste it wherever you’d like:

Copy and paste the link anywhere you want now: Email, blog posts, Pinterest, etc.


For Twitter:

You post a tweet to your profile page and then you click on the tweet from your profile page, click on “Expand”:

then click on “Details” which is next to the time stamp in grey:

and it will take you to the individual tweet which you can then either copy and  paste the direct link from the URL (see below), or you can right click the text that says “Embed This Tweet”, and there’s an option to “Copy Link Location” in the drop-down menu. Both work, so it depends on your preference.

There you go, folks. Now you can share your posts across all networks.

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